Westgate Unitarian Chapel A Grade II Star Listed Building Dating From The 1700s, Wakefield, West Yorkshire.

Westgate Unitarian Chapel A Grade II Star Listed Building Dating From The 1700s, Wakefield, West Yorkshire.

The Wakefield Heritage Action Zone Grant allowed us to work on behalf of Westgate Unitarian Chapel. Our work included training ten Wakefield College students in using hot lime mortars. The Heritage skills training in Wakefield included lime wash and lime torching techniques. The students were able to put their new skills to use immediately, and the results are already impressive.

The Westgate Unitarian Chapel is a grade II star-listed building in Wakefield, England. The heritage works contract for this Chapel was awarded to us, and we are proud to have been chosen to lead the project. The Chapel was opened on November 1st 1752, designed by John Carr and his son. The project manager at the time was Stephen Holdsworth. He used bricks made in Wakefield, England, to build the church’s exterior walls. Many architectural details were taken from Wentworth Woodhouse, and the internal bricks and timber fittings are from the earlier Chapel of 1697, known then as “The Bell Chapel”. We are committed to providing skills training in Wakefield and the surrounding areas. Our team has extensive experience in limewashing, hot lime mortar pointing, and lime torching.

Heritage Skills Training at Westgate Unitarian Chapel in Wakefield

One of the most important aspects of heritage preservation is training the next generation of craftspeople in traditional skills. That’s why we were pleased to provide students from Wakefield College and subcontractors working on behalf of Wakefield Council with skills training; We explained the benefits of using the mortar while it is hot and showed them the correct application methods. Historic England was also on-site watching the hot mixed mortar demonstrations.

The Heritage skills required for their restoration are becoming increasingly rare, but the project at Westgate Unitarian Chapel offered training opportunities for local people to learn these skills. The restoration of these heritage buildings will be a massive boost to the city’s economy and will help to attract more tourists to Wakefield. The council is committed to ensuring that these buildings are preserved for future generations. Hot lime torching, lime washing, hot lime pointing, and other traditional methods will be used in the restoration process.

One of the most important aspects of heritage preservation is training the next generation of craftspeople in traditional skills. That’s why we were pleased to provide students from Wakefield College and subcontractors working on behalf of Wakefield Council with skills training at Westgate Unitarian Chapel. The exercise involved preparing and using hot lime mortars. We explained the benefits of using the mortar while it is hot and showed them the correct application methods. Historic England was also on-site watching the hot mixed mortar demonstrations.

Restoration Work at Westgate Unitarian Chapel in Wakefield

Westgate Unitarian Chapel is a historic building that dates back to the mid-1700s. In recent years, the Chapel had begun to show signs of wear and tear, and it was clear that some restoration work was necessary. Our team of professional craftsmen set to work, undertaking various projects to restore the Chapel to its former glory. The roof tiles were hot lime torched, the bell tower and bell were inspected, surface repairs were made to the stone masonry, and the window sills were painted with lime wash. In all cases, traditional materials and methods were used in order to maintain the historic fabric of the building. The result is a beautifully restored Chapel that will stand the test of time.

The Heritage Action Zone grant provided by Historic England has allowed us to take part in restoring this beautiful Grade II Star-listed building. We provided mortar specifications and advice for Westgate Chapel, including on-site training for local colleges and allowing Wakefield Council’s chosen subcontractors access at our discretion. They have been able to practice the proper removal and application methods using hot mixed lime mortars, which are crucial when working upon traditional structures like these because they require special attention; it’s not just about looks but durability and functionality too!

Traditional Building Restoration at Westgate Unitarian Chapel in Wakefield

We used Hot lime mortar for the repair work at Westgate Unitarian Chapel. Hot lime mortar use in the UK dates back to Roman times. The hot lime mortar was used to build and paint masonry structures. It wasn’t until the early 1900s that lime began to phase out due to the loss of skilled labour during the war and the need for rapid rebuilding. Despite its long history, lime mortar is still popular for traditional masonry structures. Hot lime mortar is made from calcined limestone and is known for its durability and environmental friendliness. In addition, it is easy to work with and can be easily applied to traditional masonry structures. As a result, hot lime mortar is an ideal choice for those looking to restore or preserve historic buildings.

Lime is used to remove moisture through capillary movement. This process occurs when the lime reacts with CO2 in the air to form calcium carbonate. This calcium carbonate then binds with the water molecules in the mortar, allowing the water to be drawn out and evaporated into the air. As a result, traditional masonry structures made with hot lime mortar are more resistant to moisture damage than those made with Portland cement. In addition, traditional materials such as brick and stone are also more porous than modern materials like concrete, which helps to prevent moisture from becoming trapped inside the structure. As a result, traditional construction techniques using lime can help to create a more favourable environment for historic buildings.

Lime Torching at Westgate Unitarian Chapel in Wakefield

We undertook lime torching repairs to the roof of Westgate Unitarian Chapel. Lime torching is a traditional lime mortar used to line the roof beams and lats that join the tiles. Torching was used to prevent the build-up of moisture. Lime Torching regulates the humidity in roof spaces. It holds water vapour and releases it out amongst circulating air. Lime torching is found in many historic roof spaces, especially churches. It is vital to preserve lime torching not only for its aesthetics but also for its functionality. Lime torching is made with hot lime mortar mixed with chalk coal grit and goat’s hair. The mixture is then spread onto the surface and left to cure. Once lime torching has cured, it forms a lightweight, vapour-porous surface that can last for many years.

Yorkshire’s traditional and heritage buildings are some of the most beautiful and exciting in the country. These buildings reflect the area’s rich history, from charming cottages to grand stately homes. However, traditional buildings can be challenging to maintain, and many owners need expert help. That’s where the Yorkshire Lime Company comes in. We specialise in conventional hot lime mortar pointing, masonry repairs, lime torching, and lime washing. Our team of experts has extensive experience working with historic buildings, and we’re based in Wakefield, serving clients all over Yorkshire. If you’re looking for a company that can help restore your traditional structure to its original glory, we’re here to help. Contact us today to learn more about our services.

Traditional Skills Training in Wakefield, West Yorkshire

Westgate Unitarian Chapel is a grade II* listed building in Wakefield, West Yorkshire, England. The Chapel was built in 1826 and designed by local architect John Carr. It is one of the earliest examples of Greek Revival architecture in England. The Chapel is currently undergoing a restoration programme. This programme includes removing modern materials and applying lime wash to the stone sills. This traditional method of surface decoration not only helps to protect the masonry from weathering and gives the building a unique sense of history and identity. The use of lime wash is just one example of the many traditional heritage crafts that are being used to restore Westgate Unitarian Chapel. By utilising these time-honoured methods, we are not only preserving our architectural heritage, but we are also keeping alive an essential part of our past.

Limewashing is traditional decorating that gives walls a beautiful, natural finish. Lime pointing is a technique used to repair masonry. It involves filling the gaps between bricks and stones with lime mortar. Masonry surface repairs involve improving cracked or damaged masonry using a masonry repair mortar or shelter coat. These skills are essential for anyone who owns or manages a heritage building. By learning these skills, you can help to preserve our heritage for future generations.